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The Windrush (Black Lives Matter) by Red Eye

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Uploaded By: Trevor Perfect. Added on: 12 June 2021.
In this video:

Description

No dThis is a song from Red Eye cover raw social, emotional and political issues, based on the foundation that every song should carry a message. Further information, songs and lyrics can be found on their website:
http://www.red-eye.org.uk/

This song is about ‘The Windrush’, which was a boat, which brought a large group of people (over a 1,000) to the United Kingdom from Jamaica to London, just after the 2nd World War. Also bringing people from other U.K. colonies.

As a result of the losses during the war, the British government pleaded and encouraged mass immigration from former countries of the British Empire and Commonwealth to help them fill the shortages in the labour market after the war. As encouragement and security, the British Nationality Act 1948 gave citizens of U.K. Colonies, the right of entry and settlement in the UK and gave them UK Citizenship.

Those who came on The Windrush and on later boats, were known as ‘The Windrush Generation’.Despite being invited (not invading like The U.K. did with it’s Colonies!), despite the help The Windrush Generation provided to the U.K. and despite becoming true citizens (as promised when they left their original countries), In 2017, it was reported that the U.K. Government Home Office had threatened Commonwealth immigrants who arrived before 1973 with deportation if they could not prove their right to remain in the UK.

Subsequently many of the Windrush Generation, including their children who had lived in the U.K. all their lives, were deported from the U.K. because they did not have suitable paperwork and/or could not prove U.K. citizenship (despite it being promised, when the Windrush Generation boarded The Windrush). This disaster is know as the ‘Windrush Scandal’ and it totally ignores the important message "Black Lives Matter"; hence the reference to that message in the song.

One of the the singers (Dennis Demille) actually has parents and elder brother that were part of that migration from the Caribbean to the UK. He said “the song definitely strikes a chord with me, as my parents and elder brother were part of that migration from the Caribbean to the UK”.

I also have friends that have family affected by the Windrush Scandal and they helped me decide which of my lyrics I should use. Regarding the lyrics, the chorus line “We are here ‘cause, you were there” was based upon a speech from the U.K. Member of Parliament - David Lammy.escription
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